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Washington Remains Leader for National Board Certification

OLYMPIA — December 15, 2016 — Washington has 87 newly certified National Board Certified Teachers (NBCT) this year. An additional 271 teachers renewed their certificate. Washington ranks fourth nationwide in the total number of NBCTs (8,701).*

“I’m extremely proud of our role as a leader in the National Board program,” said Randy Dorn, superintendent of public instruction. “By continuing to support teachers through this rigorous certification process, we’re saying, ‘Teaching matters, and it’s a profession worth investing in.’”

This is the last year teachers can certify under the old certification process. Across the country, fewer teachers were certified as a result. December 2017 is the earliest candidates can certify under the new certification process. Certification under the new process can take up to 5 years. Washington currently has nearly 4,000 teachers in the pipeline, which represents 19 percent of all candidates and the highest in the country.

“We are thrilled to add more teachers to the National Board family and continue Washington's prominence as a national leader,” said Nasue Nishida, executive director of the Center for Strengthening the Teaching Profession. “By achieving this certificate these teachers have demonstrated an accomplished level of their teaching practice and are making positive impacts on their students’ learning.”

Washington by the numbers

  • Number of new NBCTs in 2016: 87
  • Number of renewed certificates in 2016: 271
  • Total number of NBCTs: 8,701 (national rank: 4th)
  • Fifteen percent of all Washington’s teachers are NBCTs

The state’s bonus and conditional loan programs have been critical to the National Board program’s success and a rapid increase in the number of NBCTs in Washington. Candidates also receive significant professional support throughout the process.

“Washington Education Association educators continue to be number one in the nation in receiving National Board Certification,” said Kim Mead, president of the association. “I am proud of the program developed by our association to assist individuals through the process and the dedication of the NBCTs to education and their students.”

Washington began incentivizing National Board Certification in 1999 with a 15 percent pay increase. In 2007, the state Legislature passed a bill that awards a $5,000 bonus to each NBCT. Teachers can receive up to an additional $5,000 bonus if they teach in “challenging” schools, which are defined as having a certain percentage of students qualify for free and reduced-price lunch (50 percent for high schools, 60 percent for middle schools and 70 percent for elementary schools).

The state’s conditional loan program helps candidates pay for the cost of certification. Loans are repaid by teachers with the bonuses they earn after becoming certified. Last year 150 NBCTs repaid $300,000 in conditional loans. This money went back into the revolving fund and has enabled the state to award loans to 1,200 new candidates.

Board certification by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards under the new process consists of four components: assessment of content knowledge, reflection on student work samples, video and analysis of teaching practice, and documentation of the impact of assessment and collaboration on student learning. The components are assessed by a national panel of peers.

For more information

* This number varies slightly from the number reported by the Board. The Board relies on teachers to self-report and maintain their contact information. Some teachers choose not to share that information. OSPI relies on a combination S-275 personnel data and Board data, and the combination is considered to be more accurate.

 

About OSPI
The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) is the primary agency charged with overseeing K–12 education in Washington state. Led by State School Superintendent Randy Dorn, OSPI works with the state’s 295 school districts and nine educational service districts to administer basic education programs and implement education reform on behalf of more than one million public school students.

OSPI provides equal access to all programs and services without discrimination based on sex, race, creed, religion, color, national origin, age, honorably discharged veteran or military status, sexual orientation, gender expression or identity, the presence of any sensory, mental, or physical disability, or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal by a person with a disability. Questions and complaints of alleged discrimination should be directed to the Equity and Civil Rights Director at (360) 725-6162 or P.O. Box 47200, Olympia, WA 98504-7200.

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CONTACT:
Nathan Olson
Communications Manager
(360) 725-6015 | nathan.olson@k12.wa.us

The OSPI Communications Office serves as the central point of contact for local, regional and national media covering K-12 education issues.

Communications Manager
Nathan Olson
(360) 725-6015

 

   Updated 12/15/2016

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